Global Health Courses

Undergraduate Courses

ANSC 129. Religion and Healing (4)

This seminar is an in-depth analysis of cultural meaning, personal experience, and therapeutic process in ritual healing, emphasizing performative/persuasive aspects of the relation between religion and health in comparative, cross-cultural perspective, and including a critical perspective identifying positive and negative effects of religion on health.

ANSC 143. Mental Health as Global Health Priority (4)

What is mental health?   Why should it be of global concern?   This course is an anthropological review of the relations among forces of globalization, culture, and mental health.  We examine mental health problems and priorities with respect to contemporary issues such as the pervasive social suffering, stigma, and economic burden associated with mental illness, conditions of gender inequality, sexual violation, war and political violence, concerns over “global security,” and the pervasive use of prescription pharmaceutical and illegal drugs worldwide.

ANSC 148. Global Health and Cultural Diversity (4)

Introduction to global health from the perspective of medical anthropology on disease and illness, cultural conceptions of health, doctor-patient interaction, illness experience, medical science and technology, mental health, infectious disease, and health care inequalities by ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic status. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

BICD 136. AIDS, Science, and Society (4)

An introduction to all aspects of the AIDS epidemic. Topics include the epidemiology, biology, and clinical aspects of HIV infection; HIV testing; education and approaches to therapy; and the social, political, and legal impacts of AIDS on the individual and society. Students may not receive credit for BILD 36 and BICD 136. Prerequisites: BILD 1, BILD 2 recommended. Health Care-Social Issues students may apply BILD 36 or BICD 136 to the minor but not both AIDS, Science, and Society courses.

BILD 30. The Biology of Plagues: Past and Present (4)

An introduction to diseases caused by viruses, bacteria, and parasites, and the impact of these diseases on human society. Topics include the biology of infectious disease, epidemiology, and promising new methods to fight disease. Three hours of lecture and one hour discussion. This course is designed for non-biology majors and does not satisfy a lower-division requirement for any biology major. (Note: Students may not receive credit for BILD 30 after receiving credit for BIMM 120.)

BILD 36. AIDS, Science, and Society (4)

An introduction to all aspects of the AIDS epidemic. Topics include the epidemiology, biology, and clinical aspects of HIV infection; HIV testing; education and approaches to therapy; and the social, political, and legal impacts of AIDS on the individual and society. Health Care-Social Issues students may apply BILD 36 or BICD 136 to the minor but not both AIDS, Science, and Society courses.

COCU 141A. Media and Technology: Global Nature, Global Culture (4)

Considers globalization’s impact on concepts of nature in and through media texts, information systems, circulation of consumer goods and services, the emergence of global brands, science, health initiatives, environmental media activism, technology transfer in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Prerequisite: COSF 100 or COCU 100 or COHI 100 or consent of instructor.

COCU 141B. Media and Technology: Gender and Biomedicine (4)

From historical and cultural aspects of media, information, imaging technology use in biomedical research, clinical care, health communication to constructions of gender, and identity. We approach the subject through audiovisual texts and writings from fields including science and technology studies and cultural studies. Prerequisite: COSF 100 or COCU 100 or COHI 100 or consent of instructor.

CONT 40. Contemporary Issues: The AIDS Epidemic (4)

Using current information, this course will deal with the worldwide spread of AIDS, particularly into communities, colleges, and universities. Discussion topics: origin, infection, biology, clinical expression, risks, vaccines, epidemiology, and the social, ethical, economic, and legal aspects of this epidemic.

ECON 141. Economics of Health Consumers (4)

Demand for health care and health insurance, employer-provision of health insurance and impact on wages and job changes. Cross country comparisons of health systems. ECON 100C is recommended. Renumbered from ECON 138B. Credit not allowed for both ECON 141 and ECON 138B. Prerequisites: ECON 100B or 170B.

CONT 40. Contemporary Issues: The AIDS ENVR 30. Environmental Issues: Natural Sciences (4)

Examines global and regional environmental issues. The approach is to consider the scientific basis for policy options. Simple principles of chemistry and biology are introduced. The scope of problems include: air and water pollution, climate modification, solid-waste disposal, hazardous-waste treatment, and environmental impact assessment. Prerequisite: none.

ETHN 142. Medicine, Race, and the Global Politics of Inequality (4)

Globalization fosters both the transmission of AIDS, cholera, tuberculosis, and other infectious diseases and gross inequalities in the resources available to prevent and cure them. This course focuses on how race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, and nation both shape and are shaped by the social construction of health and disease worldwide.

POLI 127. Politics of Developing Countries (4)

This course critically examines central concepts and theories of development, and assesses their utility in understanding political, economic, and social change in the developing world. Central case studies are drawn from three regions: Latin America, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Southeast Asia. Prerequisite: upper-division standing.

POLI 140A. International Law and Organizations (4)

International law and organizations are central to the efforts to create a world order to limit armed conflict, regulate world economy, and advance programs for economic redistribution among nations, and set minimum standards of human rights. This course explains the theory of international law and organizations that is accepted by diplomats and compares this viewpoint to the analysis of social scientists concerning the past record and likely future of world order concerning conflict, economic redistribution, and human rights.

REV160GS. Public Health and Epidemiology I - UCSD Global Seminar 2010- Amman, Jordan (4)

This course will introduce the topic of Public Health to students in the context of a developing country with a large refugee population from several wars of nearby countries, especially the large Iraqi refugee population in Amman suburbs. This course will be focusing on introducing students to the overall understanding of public health, the issues this science deals with, and the methodology needed to pursue it.

STPA 181. Essentials of Global Health (4)

Illustrates and explores ecologic settings and frameworks for study and understanding of global health and international health policy. Students acquire understanding of diverse determinants and trends of disease in various settings and inter-relationships between socio-cultural-economic development and health. Prerequisite: upper-division standing.

SOCI 40. Sociology of Health Care Issues (4)

Designed as a broad introduction to medicine as a social institution and its relationship to other institutions as well as its relation to society. It will make use of both micro and macro sociological work in this area and introduce students to sociological perspectives of contemporary health care issues.

TWS 198. Contemporary Issues in Global Health (4)

The course has two primary objectives. Firstly, it promotes an educational approach to global health that is rooted in social and political consciousness. Secondly, it hopes to empower students by equipping them with the skills and knowledge necessary to engage in research and/or participate in practical programs that address global health issues. This course is run by students with various speakers covering an array of topics relative to contemporary issues in global health, focusing on ideas of inequities and social justice. 

USP 147. Case Studies in Health Care Programs/Poor and Underserved Population (4)

The purpose of this course is to identify the special health needs of low income and underserved populations and to review their status of care, factors influencing the incidence of disease and health problems, and political and legislative measures related to access and the provision of care. Selected current programs and policies that address the health care needs of selected underserved populations such as working poor, inner city populations, recent immigrants, and persons with severe disabling mental illnesses will be studied. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

Graduate Courses

ANTH 229. Religion and Healing (4)

This seminar is an in-depth analysis of cultural meaning, personal experience, and therapeutic process in ritual healing, emphasizing performative/persuasive aspects of the relation between religion and health in comparative, cross-cultural perspective, and including a critical perspective identifying positive and negative effects of religion on health.

ANTH 243. Mental Health as Global Health Priority (4)

What is mental health?   Why should it be of global concern?   This course is an anthropological review of the relations among forces of globalization, culture, and mental health.  We examine mental health problems and priorities with respect to contemporary issues such as the pervasive social suffering, stigma, and economic burden associated with mental illness, conditions of gender inequality, sexual violation, war and political violence, concerns over “global security,” and the pervasive use of prescription pharmaceutical and illegal drugs worldwide.

ANTH 259. Gender and Mental Health (4)

This seminar in psychological/psychiatric anthropology takes a comparative, cross-cultural approach to the study of gender and mental health. Culture and feminist theory is employed to address questions of gender in relation to various problems, such as depression, anxiety, violence, and eating disorders. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

ETHN 260. Transnationalism and Borderlands: The Local and Global (4)

This course critically reviews the analytical frameworks of transnationalism and borderlands. The goals are to assess traditional and current social science practice on immigration, identity, and community studies, and to understand how diverse peoples engage and participate in global processes. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ETHN 262. Race, Inequality, and Health (4)

New critical and multidisciplinary perspectives provide tools for examining entrenched and newly emerging diseases and inequalities. This course examines medicine and public health in relationship to race, gender, sexuality, class, and nation and explores how these connections affect the distribution of health and health services locally, nationally, and internationally. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

FPM 244. San Quintin Field Course (3)

In 1981, Tijuana’s Universidad Autonoma de Baja California (UABC) School of Medicine began a series of academic and research field trips to rural regions in Baja California and Sonora. These trips are now an integral part of the academic curriculum for 1st and 2nd year medical students. In 1998, the original faculty team expanded the agenda for these trips, and named the project VIIDAI: Viaje Interinstitucional de Integracion, Docente, Asistencia y de Investigacion (Retreat for Educational Integration, Assistance and Investigation). Trips involve a combination of hands-on clinical experience as well as public health research and practice. Students can take part in activities ranging from clinical practice, to survey research, to health promotion and education. Cross-cultural exchange is an integral component of this course. Competency in Spanish is not required, but adds significantly to the student’s experience. Prerequisite: Required course for Joint Doctoral Program students in Global Health, medical student, graduate student, or consent of instructor.

FPM 251 A,B,C. Conversational Spanish for Medical Students-Beginning Level

This course is designed to develop the ability to communicate and relate to Spanish-speaking patients. Special emphasis is given to developing interviewing skills to obtain a complete medical history in Spanish. Clinical experiences in Spanish-speaking communities are featured in order to practice interviewing skills while culturally immersed. This course is open to beginners with little or no background.

NOTE: Since the purpose of the whole course is to acquire oral proficiency, enrollment is required for all three consecutive quarters (full academic year). A certificate of accomplishment will be issued at the conclusion of the course.  Prerequisite: second-year medical student

FPM 270A. Cultural Perceptions About Health and Disease

The U.S. is characterized by significant ethnic and cultural diversity due to historic and ongoing immigration. The purpose of this course is to examine issues related to ethnic and cultural diversity and how culture may impact health beliefs, health status, and utilization of health services. The course examines issues faced by health providers and researchers who work with diverse populations in domestic or international settings. We will also explore the concept of cultural competence and how it may be achieved. Relevant socio-cultural theories will also be addressed. Prerequisite: Required course for Joint Doctoral Program students in Global Health, medical student, graduate student, or consent of instructor.

MED 287/FPM 287. Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases (3)

Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases is a single quarter seminar -based course designed to introduce medical and graduate students to concepts of emerging infectious diseases. In our global environment deforestation, mass food production, frequent world travel, human and animal interaction, medical advances, and political upheaval, among many other factors, have contributed to the emergence of new and re-emergence of once contained infectious diseases. This course will focus on factors associated with disease emergence and re-emergence and on ways to identify, study, and control these epidemics and outbreaks. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, 1st or 2nd year Medical Student. Required course for JDP Global Health students.

MED 245/STPA 181. Essentials of Global Health (4)

The sociocultural, economic, and geo-political framework for the study and understanding of medical problems on a worldwide scale, and as basis for international health policy is presented. Using global patterns of disease, availability and needs for medical technology, and comparisons between diverse medical education and health care delivery systems abroad with those in the United States, students should be able to acquire an understanding of diverse determinants of disease and of relationships between socioeconomic development and health. Prerequisite: Medical or graduate student; senior-level undergraduate students by special permission.